DJ Mag

 

 

 

 

 

The work of UK-based Tom Eno and Denmark-based René Kirkegaard, collectively known as Mountain Folk, ‘Don’t Go Down There’ might be a bit of a slow-burner, but it’s definitely worth sticking with for the whole of its seven minutes and twelve seconds. Strangely hypnotic and effortlessly restrained, it’s no wonder that this track has been piquing the attention of the likes of Steve Lamacq and Rob Da Bank.”

Tom Robinson (6 Music)
http://freshonthenet.co.uk/faves15

 

Mountain Folk are contenders for next weeks BIG ONE on John Kennedy’s XFM Xposure show, please vote for us here: Go on!
“A now for another epic tune, think we need to play this one all next week- a contender for next week’s big one” John Kennedy XFM

Jon Kennedy (XFM)
http://t.co/0BFrhQb5

 

Don’t Go Down There by Mountain Folk featured on the Rob Da Bank show on BBC Radio 1 (1hr 05 minutes in)

“A Lovely Record, a little bit of pastoral beauty”

Rob Da Bank (BBC Radio1)

http://www.bestiblog.net/2012/06/radio-da-bank-lianne-la-havas-in.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/player/b01j261d

 

Juno Download review:

Two Danish producers, one with a penchant for acoustica and the other more rooted in electronica and house, Mountain Folk have rightly received some generous support from Don Letts, Steve Lamacq and Rob da Bank on Radio of late. Their talents gel superbly on “Don’t Go Down There” – recalling everything from Hot Chip, When Saints Go Machine and early Four Tet and Caribou with an earthy texture coming from their mix of natural and analogue sounds. Mixes from Afrikanz On Marz and Sundogs make this quirky delight more floor-friendly, but the originals’ still the main attraction for us.

 

“I love the mood of Mountain Folk!”
Kid Loco, Tastemaker

 

“Best thing played on John Kennedy’s show..I Love it”
Linn Branson, LittleIndieBlogs

 

 What’s in a name? With a moniker like Mountain Folk you’d be forgiven for imagining this new project to be full of battered acoustic guitars and check-shirted men with over-sized beards, singing heartfelt songs suited for camp fires and log cabins. When this act was sent over to us for consideration, you can imagine that the assumptions made from their choice of title might have us parking it as yet another potential Bella Union suitor, and although Fleet Foxes fans may find lots to admire here, this is actually far more cerebral and weird than you might expect. So does that mean a band name is irrelevant? Well, let us suggest that it could mis-guide and potentially put people off, so it has an importance to a certain extent, but thankfully, even though there’s very little on offer here that can be described as mountainous or folkish – at least in the traditional sense – the music is mind-numbingly good, rendering the moniker a rapidly fading issue.

Mountain Folk is the new outfit being worn by Tom Eno and René Kirkegaard. Kirkegaard has operated a record store, called Dezigner Soundz, for the last 15 years in her home town of Aarhus, Denmark. The store’s speciality seems to be focused on electronica, house and hip hop music, generating something of a focal point for the vinyl-hungry locals. Eno was introduced to her last year and they’ve set about developing this new project ever since. The UK-based Eno, (who confirmed to us that he is absolutely no relation to Brian – we had to check, right?), is perhaps better known for more of an acoustic history, having released two solo albums prior to stepping into this new duo. They’re planning to release their debut single, Don’t Go Down There, on Jack To Phono Records on June 25th. We’ve been reliably informed that they are currently in the process of recording and producing the complete debut album, which they hope to have out later on in 2012.

The two protagonists clearly have a lot of space between them, (both geographically and musically), with Kirkegaard surveying the electronic end of the spectrum and Eno preferring the strings of an acoustic guitar. This starts them off with a very large gap to fill, but thanks to their open-minds and creative ideas they seem to not only have bridged it, but in fact they’ve crammed the space with some extraordinary invention. Originality is so hard to find these days, so just how do you locate new concepts in the modern era when you have to compete with the dense range of ideas from over the decades. Thankfully today’s Internet generation and the technological revolution going on in bedrooms around the globe allow a new unlimited space for ideas to flourish. The debut single on offer from this duo doesn’t quite sound like anything you’ve ever heard before, proving that in today’s over-crowded online jungle the fight for the light can still be won with imagination. Their two opposing ends of the spectrum have allowed Mountain Folk to blend the authenticity of finger-to-string with a computerised electronic pulse. This is a lesson in fusing the old with the new.

Don’t Go Down is over seven minutes long so this isn’t aiming for broad commercial appeal, although it’s actually already featured on BBC Radio One and 6Music’s specialist shows, with Steve Lamacq, Tom Robinson and Rob Da Bank already supporting it. It begins with an underplayed echoing beat, that tweaks it’s handclaps just enough to make you realise this is a song that will have electronics woven into it. Eno’s vocals arrive delivering the slacker melodies, reminiscent of Beck at his Mutations best, before subtle electronics creep ever closer to the centre ground. There’s a dreamlike quality to it all, losing none of the original pace or melody, but after five minutes you find yourself taken away from what felt like some kind of dusty Spanish Sierra into Outta Space. After six minutes you’re chugging along inside an unidentifiable vehicle of layered thermionic synthesizers. It’s a journey, a ride, between Eno’s acoustics and Kirkegaard’s electronics. It’s stunningly beautiful and by bravely pulling together two experts in their very different fields we see them collide in the middle with an explosive song.

Alastair Lee, a film maker, was so impressed by the track he used it in his recent filmMoonflower and lent them some footage of Alaska which had filmed, (you can see that below), for the single’s accompanying video. Remixes arrive from Afrikanz On Marz and Sundogs, with both choosing to turn what is a seven-minute song into a near ten-minute opus. Eno kindly sent us an alternative version of another album track, Black Fields, in what he’s called the ‘cabin mix’. It’s another patient song, although this time coming in at only just over four minutes, but it retains the same style of samples that come in firing synapses and curious loops. It doesn’t explode like the single, instead selecting a more mature and thoughtful path, but it’s still original and enticing. For what is the equivalent of just a b-side version of an album track this is mightily impressive. Although it turned out that Fleet Foxes need not worry after all, this is still a lesson for all other artists out there; that to locate genuinely original ideas, whilst maintaining the melodies and the accessibility, you need to be brave, to be bold and to look for ideas in new spaces.

Mike Bradford, The Recommender (Brighton)

 

Mountain Folk are to release the excellent new single ‘Don’t Go Down There’ on 12″ vinyl later this month.Mountain Folk is René Kirkegaard, a DJ/ Producer based in Aarhus, Denmark and Winchester based Tom Eno. In 1997 René set up the record shop Dezigner Soundz which quickly became a focal point for vinyl crazy Aarhus DJs. It quickly established itself and had DJ Static running the hip hop section whilst René took care of electronica and house music. Tom Eno has been busy recording acoustic material for his 2 studio albums to date and wanted to work on more electronic based project. René and Tom were introduced in 2011 and started to fire ideas across the North Sea – the rest is history.Don’t Go Down There will be released on 12″ vinyl on June 25th on Jack to Phono Records. The album is in production and will follow later in 2012. 

 

 

 

 

Mountain Folk to release Don’t Go Down There on 12″ vinyl

BY  ⋅ JUNE 17, 2012 ⋅ POST A COMMENT

Mountain Folk are to release the excellent new single Don’t Go Down There on 12″ vinyl later this month.

Mountain Folk is a new project on Jack to Phono Records. René Kirkegaard is a DJ/Producer based in Aarhus, Denmark. In 1997 René set up the record shop Dezigner Soundz which quickly became a focal point for vinyl crazy Aarhus DJs. It quickly established itself and had DJ Static running the hip hop section whilst René took care of electronica and house music. Winchester based Tom Eno has been busy recording acoustic material for his 2 studio albums to date and wanted to work on more electronic based project. René and Tom were introduced in 2011 and started to fire ideas across the North Sea – the rest is history.

The project got the attention of Alastair Lee, a film maker, who was so impressed that he used the track in his recent film Moonflower. He was also also generous enough to release footage from Alaska for the video.

 

There are two luminaries of the music world, Ashley Beedle (Afrikanz on Marz) and Sundogs (Tactical Hots Records), who have remixed the track for the 12-inch release. The track has also been played on BBC Radio 1, BBC 6 Music, XFM and Danish National Radio in recent weeks. Tom makes his singing debut on the track and the mix of acoustic guitar blended with René’s electronic world make the sound unique on JTP. The album is in production and will follow later in 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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